What are Patch Pockets?

Patch pockets are a type of pocket that is sewn on the outside of clothing. They’re more common on jackets, jeans, but can be found on shirts and even skirts as well.

What are Patch Pockets?

Patch pockets have been around for centuries, appearing in illustrations as early as the 19th century. In addition to being fashionable, they also serve an important practical purpose: keeping your hands warm when you aren’t wearing gloves!

Patch pockets are also known as welt pockets. A “welt” is another type of pocket that’s sewn on the outside of a piece of clothing, and it contains a strip of folded fabric called a “flesh.” This strip runs up to the waist seam and can be seen on both sides of the pocket. On patch pockets, the flesh doesn’t continue beyond where it would meet at an edge and leave a hole. You can usually tell which type of pocket you’re looking at by identifying this flesh line.

Many different types and styles of patch pockets exist for jackets and pants alike–including those with flaps or without! The most common style for jeans has two straight lines that form an upside-down V shape.

Patch pockets are usually found in casual styles since they’re suited for multiple purposes like carrying your hands around when it’s too cold to wear gloves, but not necessarily formal enough for a jacket that you’d wear with a suit or other dress clothes. That said, there’s no limit to the different types of clothing that can have patch pockets! Many jackets and coats have them as well as pairs of pants. You can even find them on skirts and dresses from time to time!

Some people also call patch pockets “pockets with holes.” This is because sometimes the pocket itself has an opening rather than being sewn shut all the way around. On jeans, this typically only happens on one side near the bottom corner of the pocket. On other types of clothing, this can happen in any area the designer chooses and often varies from pocket to pocket depending on how many openings it has and where they are!

Patch pockets aren’t only found sewn onto the outside of clothing either. They also exist as a sewn-in flap that hangs out from the inside of a waistband or lining! In fact, whether you know it or not, it’s kind of likely that you’re familiar with patch pockets even if you don’t own anything with them yet since lots of different brands make jackets with patch pockets these days! These examples usually have a lighter color lining around them though.

Without a doubt, patch pockets are one of the most common types of pockets on jeans.

When you need to carry around your hands, this is an excellent choice! These pockets are so popular that it’s even common to see multiple patch pockets sewn onto jeans, one on each side of the front. Jeans can also have them on the backside too – usually only one per leg though.

Jeans aren’t the only type of pants that can have patch pockets either. Cargo pants frequently feature them since they serve a purpose like carrying your stuff around without needing to actually put anything in your hands! These pockets are typically rectangular with rounded corners (rather than upside-down V shaped). They’re often located near the hips or crotch area and may or may not be visible when you look at someone wearing them.

Patch pockets are also sometimes found on skirts and dresses, but this isn’t very common. They’re most often found in casual styles where the clothing item is meant to be used for multiple purposes like holding your hands when it’s cold outside or carrying something without needing to use your hands.

Conclusion

Without a doubt, patch pockets are one of the most popular types of pockets that you can find on jeans! They’ve been around so long that they’re practically tradition at this point since they work so well in so many different situations. So if you ever buy clothes with front patch pockets, don’t let anyone tell you not to use them! You can carry anything from your wallet and keys your cell phone, regardless o wh you’re doing.

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